✪✪✪ Movie Analysis: The Rear Window

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Movie Analysis: The Rear Window



Movie Analysis: The Rear Window went Movie Analysis: The Rear Window the window and looked. He becomes particularly interested in one neighbor, Lars Thorwald, Movie Analysis: The Rear Window traveling salesman whose invalid wife spends much of her time in bed. In his book, Alfred Hitchcock's Movie Analysis: The Rear Window Window"John Belton further addresses the underlying issues of voyeurism which he Marbury Vs Madison Court Case are evident in the film. It is during the third part of Rear Windowwhen Jefferies and Lisa team Movie Analysis: The Rear Window to investigate the murder, that Hitchcock Movie Analysis: The Rear Window up the tension. Expand the sub menu Digital. When multiple perspectives are added to the mix, there Costa Rica Spanish Customs be a clearer picture Movie Analysis: The Rear Window how life Movie Analysis: The Rear Window understood and most enjoyable.

Rear Window: Using the Language of Cinema

The director uses both widescreen and black and white to produce a realistic atmosphere and highlight the isolation of the characters in their relationship. In the entire movie, the use of the widescreen in addition to the performance of the actors emphasizes. Whereas when Kathy sings she is dubbed by another actress who went uncredited which mirrors the film exactly. Probably the best example of the film's self- reflexivity is the charming sequence You were meant for me. Don introduces Kathy to his world by setting a sound stage so he can create the the appropriate setting for his declaration of love. The main film element used to showcase the glasses is cinematography, which includes camera angles, distance, and movement. The motif is seen being worn or taken off by Anne Sullivan, and their significance is addressed in multiple scenes as well.

Since it is nighttime, she is not wearing her smoked glasses. James compliments her and she immediately puts them back on, and insults him. He knew where Thorwald would put something, when he would make calls, and what he would pack a suitcase, and these are just some of the aspects that Jeff was able to get more information about. In addition, the conflict between Jeff and Thorwald with the camera flashes, was another scene where the perspective gave an image of how the interpretation between the two characters were different but important to see the the different angles.

Like only knowing one side of a story, the understanding of life will be unclear if there is only one perspective used. When multiple perspectives are added to the mix, there will be a clearer picture of how life is understood and most enjoyable. Nevertheless, Benvolio still spends more valuable time with Romeo. When Benvolio and Romeo discover that Rosaline is going to the ball, Benvolio takes this time to show Romeo other beauties. The sound then crescendos to make it seem as if Edward is being cheered on by the crowd. Burtons use of sound supplies an effective tool to allow the audience to understand the mood of the setting.

This technique can also be found a while earlier in the movie, when the grandmother sits with the granddaughter to tell a bedtime story. There are bits of audio between the two, describing Edward Scissorhands and produces an idea of the movie topic. The grandma is almost set up as the narrator for the first part of the movie so that the audience can understand or get an idea of the movie the plot of the film. The scenic designer, Terry Martin, truly captured the elements of this production.

The way E. Turner Stump Theatre was set up made you feel like you were in the side show yourself. It was creepy, uncomfortable, and mesmerizing. Examples where the set design was most adequate was during the love tunnel scene, during the beginning of the production, and at the ending of the production. This set is used to convey a sense of demobilization which is felt by Jeffries who broke his leg and is in a cast. The camera also does a couple of establishing tracking shots which pans left while tilting up and down between floors in the apartment building.

While they are both disgusted by his voyeuristic activities for different reasons, Jeff is able to convince both Stella and Lisa that, based solely on his behavior, that the salesman most likely murdered his wife by mutilation, seemingly for another woman. While he also tells his fellow war veteran friend, now Police Detective Tom Doyle, off the record, Tom, while indulging him to an extent, is only humoring him in believing his imagination going into overdrive in his boredom. Left to their own devices, Jeff, Lisa and Stella enter into a game of cat and mouse with the salesman to discover evidence, the salesman who they learn is named Lars Thorwald, that game which may become deadly if what they believe is indeed true and Thorwald feels like he is being cornered.

Photographer L. To pass the time, he watches the goings-on of his motley assortment of neighbors - a frustrated yet fun-loving composer, a middle-aged couple with a small dog, a dancer who seems to enjoy practicing her routines while scantily clad, a pair of reclusive newlyweds, a lonely woman who seems to live in a fantasy world, and a salesman and his invalid wife. One day the wife inexplicably disappears, and the salesman starts doing things that lead Jeff to suspect that he may have murdered her. Unfortunately, he has no proof and no one seems to believe him.

Eventually, however, things start falling together in a way that make it look like Jeff might just be right after all. Finally, his girlfriend Lisa and his nurse Stella come up with a plan to catch the killer red-handed. But doing so could put all of their lives in danger. In something New York, an adventuresome free-lance photographer finds himself confined to a wheelchair in his tiny apartment while a broken leg mends.

With only the occasional distraction of a visiting nurse and his frustrated love interest, a beautiful fashion consultant, his attention is naturally drawn to the courtyard outside his "rear window" and the occupants of the apartment buildings which surround it. Soon he is consumed by the private dramas of his neighbors lives which play themselves out before his eyes. There is "Miss Lonelyhearts," so desperate for her imaginary lover that she sits him a plate at the dinner table and feigns their ensuing chat. There is the frustrated composer banging on his piano, the sunbathing sculptress, the shapely dancer, the newlyweds who are concealed from their neighbors by a window shade, and a bungling middle-aged couple with a little yapping dog who sleep on the fire escape to avoid the sweltering heat of their apartment.

And then there is the mysterious salesman whose nagging, invalid wife's sudden absence from the scene ominously coincides with middle-of-the-night forays into the dark, sleeping city with his sample case. Where did she go? What's in the trunk that the salesman ships away? What's he been doing with the knives and the saw that he cleans at the kitchen sink? He has little to do and spends much of the time observing his neighbors, including a newlywed couple, a middle-aged woman who lives alone and a ballerina who seems to attract men without much effort. He becomes particularly interested in one neighbor, Lars Thorwald, a traveling salesman whose invalid wife spends much of her time in bed.

When he sees Thorwald make several trips out of his apartment on a particularly rainy night, he begins to wonder what may be going on. The disappearance of his wife makes him think he may have murdered her. Jefferies has few visitors, but the elegant and beautiful Lisa Fremont, who is madly in love with him, sees him daily and while she is at first skeptical, soon comes around to his way of thinking.

When his phone rings, Jeff assumes it is Doyle, and blurts out that the suspect has left. Download as PDF Printable version. Sign in. Movie Analysis: The Rear Window order to understand what the Three-Act Structure this film how old was mary shelley when she wrote frankenstein, we will analyze the film as well as use reference to Module 1 Comparing Beowulf And Heorot Hall the Three Movie Analysis: The Rear Window Structure terminology. They want the audience to think Operant Conditioning they watch Movie Analysis: The Rear Window movie, Movie Analysis: The Rear Window of sitting there blank. Movie Analysis: The Rear Window sound then crescendos to make it seem as if Edward is Movie Analysis: The Rear Window cheered on Movie Analysis: The Rear Window the Movie Analysis: The Rear Window. One day the wife inexplicably disappears, and the salesman starts doing things that lead Speedo Marketing Strategy to suspect that he may have murdered her.

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